COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Grades K-12

ELA Courses Grades K-5 Math Courses Grades K-5 Science Courses Grades K-5 Social Students Courses Grades K-5 Art Courses Grades K-5 PE Courses Grades K-5 Virtual Courses Grades 6-8 Virtual Courses Grades 9-12

LANGUAGE ARTS

LANGUAGE ARTS – KINDERGARTEN
This Kindergarten Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters, produce letter sounds and frequently used phonograms. Students will also master weekly sight words and reading and comprehension strategies to grow as readers. All K Louisiana State Standards are met in this course.

LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 1
This 1st grade Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters produce letter sounds and frequently used phonograms. Students will also master weekly sight words and reading and comprehension strategies to grow as readers. All Grade 1 Louisiana State Standards are met in this course.

LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 2
This 2nd grade Language Arts course will teach students to spell and write vocabulary, read more fluently, apply grammar concepts, and participate in handwriting and writing activities through thematic units. Students will also continue to master weekly sight words and reading and comprehension strategies to grow as readers. All Grade 2 Louisiana State Standards are met in this course.

LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 3
This 3rd grade Language Arts course will teach students to reading comprehension skill and strategies to help them become stronger readers. Students will also master weekly spelling and vocabulary words and grammar concepts that will help them become stronger writers. All Grade 3 Louisiana State Standards are met in this course.

LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 4
The 4th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today’s learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Student study classic literature as well as more contemporary forms, including media and multimedia products. Students learn how informational text differs literary text and how different forms of information differ from each other. Writing assignments focus on narrative, persuasive and expository modes. Writing will emphasize the use of reasoning and details to support opinions as well as guide students through research projects. Each writing assignment spans several lessons and guides students through a writing process that begins with prewriting and ends by emphasizing one or more aspects of standard written English. Students also learn how to participate in collaborative discussion and peer review sessions.

LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 5
The 5th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today’s learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Student study classic literature as well as more contemporary forms, including media and multimedia products. Students learn how informational text differs literary text and how different forms of information differ from each other. Writing assignments focus on narrative, persuasive and expository modes. Writing will emphasize the use of reasoning and details to support opinions as well as guide students through research projects. Each writing assignment spans several lessons and guides students through a writing process that begins with prewriting and ends by emphasizing one or more aspects of standard written English. Students also learn how to participate in collaborative discussion and peer review sessions. Near the end of the year, students learn how to present information orally and using multimedia.

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MATHEMATICS

MATHEMATICS – KINDERGARTEN
The Kindergarten course will teach students foundational math facts. They will learn to count to 20, how to compare object sizes using the terms tall, longer, and shorter as well as comparing two objects using the terms lighter and heavier. They will also learn about ordinal numbers, what a number line is and its uses, basic measurements such as inches and feet, basic geometric shapes such as cones and spheres, count coins such as pennies, nickels and dimes and how to tell time on digital and analog clocks. Students will have many opportunities to practice these new concepts by interacting with online confirmation exercises and filling out worksheets off line. A special emphasis is for students to have fun with numbers, finding success with concepts such as bigger and smaller and being comfortable in an online environment.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 1
The 1st grade course will build fluency with basic math facts. They will learn to count to 100 by twos, fives, and tens, basic addition and subtraction facts, and how to add double-digit numbers. Students will be introduced to such new concepts as word problems, odd and even numbers, and basic geometric concepts. Students are introduced to multiplication and division and the sings used in those operations. Students continue their exploration of geometric shapes through drawing and apply what they learn about various figures in Venn diagrams. There is an emphasis on learning practical skills such as reading thermometers, looking at maps, and understanding the value of coins. Students will have multiple opportunities to practice new skills and knowledge through using integrated online practice problems.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 2
The 2nd grade course will build fluency with basic math facts and add and subtract within 100 to solve word problems using strategic methods. Students will also manipulate numbers to 1000 using knowledge of hundreds, tens, and ones. They will use place value to estimate and solve word problems to demonstrate skill. Students will measure and collect data to represent the information on graphs, and recognize 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional shapes by specific characteristics. Students with demonstrate arrays with repeated addition.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 3
The 3rd grade course will build flexibility with numbers as students master addition and subtraction facts as well as multiplication and division facts. Students will understand relationships between addition and subtraction, multiplication and addition and multiplication and division as they learn to borrow, carry, and regroup in order to find sums and differences of two whole numbers up to 10,000. Students will also comprehend the place value of base ten numbers up to 1,000,000 in order to find patterns and make estimations. They will implement a 4-step approach to solving problems and express numbers differently including translating them into Roman Numerals or expressing them as ordinal numbers. Students will explore concepts of measurement including linear measurement, weight, volume, temperature, and time. They will recognize, compare, and convert fraction. Students will write amounts of money and make change using as few coins as possible. Lastly, student will examine lines, polygons, and solid figures as they are introduced to basic concepts of geometry.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 4
The 4th grade course uses a varied amount of instructional material to reinforce and teach new math skills to the 4th grade learners. Instruction includes creative videos, mathematical storytelling, practical math applications and repetition to reinforce skills throughout the course. Three areas are focused on and students will finish the course with a strong knowledge in these content areas. The first is developing an understanding and fluency with multi-digit multiplication and developing the understanding of dividing to find quotients involving multi-digit dividends. The second is developing an understanding of fraction equivalence, addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators, multiplication of fractions with whole numbers and converting fractions to decimals. The third is developing an understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel lines, perpendicular sides, angle measure, and symmetry. Lesson on rectangles, line plots, angles, and figure drawing will be taught.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 5
The 5th grade course uses a varied amount of instructional material to reinforce and teach new math skills to the 4th grade learners. Instruction includes creative videos, mathematical storytelling, practical math applications and repetition to reinforce skills throughout the course. Three areas are focused on and students will finish the course with a strong knowledge in these content areas. The first is developing an understanding and fluency with multi-digit multiplication and developing the understanding of dividing to find quotients involving multi-digit dividends. The second is developing an understanding of fraction equivalence, addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators, and multiplication of fractions with whole numbers. The third critical area is volume. Students will receive lessons in measurement of length, weight, and volume. They will end the course with a focus on geometry.

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SCIENCE

SCIENCE – KINDERGARTEN
In Kindergarten science, students in this course will use their senses to explore their world. Students experience nature walks, gardening, and imitative games by exploring varying concepts.

SCIENCE – GRADE 1
In 1st grade science, students in this course will complete projects that are designed to allow for exploration and discovery. Students observe their surroundings and through observations of the natural world conduct inquiries into topics related to their healthy development.

SCIENCE – GRADE 2
The 2nd grade science course introduces students to the process of observation and how important it is to the study of science. Learners will identify their five senses and why they are critical to observation. Students will use these observation skills throughout the course as they examine many different types of animals and their environments. Students will come to understand the different groupings of animals including those with vertebrates, invertebrates and warm-and cold-blooded animals, carnivores, herbivores and omnivores. Students also learn how animals communicate and the relationship between animals and humans. Students begin by observing ants in their own environments and continue onto learning the different types of birds. Students will come to understand plant and animal rhythms and will perform small experiments with plants. Stories will be used to teach the students about nature and interactions that humans have with nature. Students will learn through video, audio stories, hands-on participation and observation with nature. The teachers will conduct live assessments for the topics that had been covered throughout the week's lessons. Grade 2 Science provides students with the opportunity to expand their minds and see for themselves the way that animals and nature are a part of their everyday lives.

SCIENCE – GRADE 3
The 3rd grade science course introduces students to experimentation as they journey through the earth and its many miracles. They will begin by learning about the earth, the sun and the moon. By participating in simple experiments students will explore the water cycle, gravity, the weather and its patterns, various types of terrain, and the role of plants in the production of oxygen and their importance to human survival. Learners will expand their knowledge through video, pictures, short readings, projects, and hands on experiments. Learners will understand that experiments require the use of instruments, observation, recording, and drawing evidence based conclusions. Grade 3 science provides students with the opportunity to expand their minds and see for themselves the way that science is a part of their everyday lives.

SCIENCE – GRADE 4
The 4th grade science course includes the three main domains of science, which are physical, life, and earth and space science. Learners will use various kinds of experimenting, including field studies, systematic observations, models, and controlled experiences. The course begins with the explanation of the scientific method, which the students continue to use and build upon throughout the course. The big picture of the earth is examined as students review the life on planet earth, salt and fresh water, and fast and slow changes that occur on the planet. Students go beyond planet earth, though, as they study galaxies, the solar system and other planets. Students examine the ways that forces, and motion can be measured and the concept that a single kind of matter can exist as a solid, liquid or gas. Students also focus on the relationship between heat, light, sound, and electrical energy and the way they can be transferred between each other. Grade 4 science uses many modes of instruction including video presentations, enrichment activities, and hands-on experimentation. The course ends by looking at ways that humans interact with the environment.

SCIENCE – GRADE 5
The 5th grade science course continues to build on the science skills that have been obtained in years previous. There will be an emphasis on earth and space science, life science, and physical science. Students will begin the course by focusing on earth and space science by looking at the solar system and planets. Students will come to an understanding of the concept of the earth as a sphere and the earth's place in the solar system. The course continues with a focus on physical science and the different tools that can measure force, time, and distance. They will also grow in their understanding of how light and sound travel and interact with each other as well as the different types of energy. Students will also grow in their understanding of the importance of good nutrition to all living organisms. The course concludes with a look into life science and the ways that organisms are interconnected as well as a look into the scientific process and the importance of investigations and conclusions in the study of science. Instruction will include real life application, hands-on projects and assessments, and video and short research projects.

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SOCIAL STUDIES

SOCIAL STUDIES – KINDERGARTEN
This course introduces students to their place in the community and the responsibilities of being a member of society. Students will learn about everyday heroes, the responsibilities of pet ownership, the importance of rules, table manners, and eating well. They will also learn map reading skills. They will learn about symbols of the U.S. such as the American flag and the eagle. They will be introduced to what money is, how money can be spent, the power of buying locally, and the difference between wants and needs. A skill that students will practice throughout the course is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Projects will help students think about what pets need and defining emotions.

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 1
In this course, students begin to explore fundamentals of social studies including map skills, cardinal directions, and will begin to examine maps of the U.S. and the globe. Students will also be introduced to bartering, goods and services, jobs in the community, and how the marketplace works. A skill that students will practice throughout the course is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Students will also make maps of their homes, neighborhoods, as well as a personal timeline

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 2
In 2nd grade, students in this course will begin to explore the fundamentals of social studies including culture, geography, economics and the role that money plays in every civilization. Students will explore the Ancient Cultures of China, Africa, and the Celts. Students will explore these cultures through ancient folk tales and fables. Students will create a photo book that describes the significant events in their own life. They will also examine the importance of geography and direction. Students will learn how to locate boundaries while using a world map. Students will identify the places that were discussed in the previous lessons including Africa, China, and the British Isles. They will develop a rudimentary understanding of map symbols as they locate continents, the equator, and oceans. Students will also learn to identify on a road map where they live, rivers, mountain ranges and lakes nearby their homes. Students will follow a step-by-step approach for successfully completing each lesson, which includes storytelling, repetition, projects, arts and crafts, and videos.

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 3
In 3rd grade, social studies students will begin to explore the fundamentals of social studies including geography, civics, economics, and the role that money plays in every civilization. Learners will begin by looking at the beginning of civilization and examining the ancient Hebrew civilization, the Phoenicians, and the Kush tribe of ancient Africa. They will then move on to examining the Native American tribes of the Cherokee, Sioux, and Hopi. Students will also look at the first explorers of the Americas and learn about the beginning of the United States. Students will learn important geographical factors in the ancient civilizations, Native American tribes and in the developing United States. Students will increase their skills by creating maps and looking at the landscapes. They will take a close look at their own personal heritage by mapping their ancestry. The course ends by discussing the purpose and nature of government as it relates to the United States. Students will follow a step-by-step approach for successfully completing each lesson, which includes storytelling, repetition, projects, arts and crafts, and videos.

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 4
In 4th grade, social studies learners will use their understanding of social studies skills to explore their local states and communities. They will begin the course by learning the topography of their area. Students will do this by creating a detailed landscape model. This project will be hands-on and require students to do research of their communities. Students will also research local animals and gain an understanding of local Native American ground in their part of the country. This course walks students through the research and report writing steps that will be vital to their continuation of social studies. They will continue to focus on their individual states as they do projects based on local geography, state capitols, as well as nearby natural wonders and landforms. Students examine the difficulties that early settlers faced when reaching America. They apply knowledge of historical thinking, chronology, turning points, individuals, and themes of local and United States history in order to understand how history has shaped the present and will shape the future. The transition from the pony express to the transcontinental railroad is a major theme that shows how quickly the United States developed. The course uses video, enrichment activities, and project-based learning to enhance the student's social studies skills.

SOCIAL STUDIES – GRADE 5
In 5th grade, social studies combines the study of United States History through the Civil War with a geographical exploration of the Unites States and what it has to offer. Students will use their understanding of social studies skills and concepts as they study the development of the United States. The course begins with early settlements of North America and allows learners to take an in-depth look into what life was like for colonists and Native Americans. Students will come to understand the causes of the Revolutionary War and the people that played a significant role in it. The course ends with students examining the new nation and what life was like for European immigrants and those on the frontier. Students will plan and describe a trip they would like to take to a place within the 50 states. Students will learn using video, journaling, and varied types of creative instruction.

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ART

ART DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 1
The importance of fine arts is a benefit, not just to the older student and population, but is a necessary area of development for the young student who will benefit with it in all areas of education. Art provides an opportunity for children to develop the use of their senses directly and encourages the student to further develop what they already know as a source of knowledge and creativity. It is important for the student to make a connection between the verbal and visual; logic and emotions; imagination and reality. Art offers the student an opportunity to express feelings and emotions in their drawings and with color. The fine art program promotes self-esteem and self-awareness as it enhances personal fulfillment. Children have a wonderful imagination that, if encouraged, will be needed though out their life. This program provides an opportunity for self-discipline through instruction and cooperation while providing the student with an opportunity for self-expression by using imaginative thinking for creative solutions. Again, this is a necessity in lifetime experiences. The student will see the artistic expressions and inventions from cultures around the world that are part of the history of mankind and development. Modern media provides many opportunities to the student. However, the student has the benefit to experience it more closely in art classes. Repetition, important for young children, is evident in these lessons. Repetition is provided at different age levels while using various tools and mediums. Home, family and friends, pets, and toys are the young student's world. The student will begin with their personal world as they think they know it and discover so much more about it. These lessons provide a deeper awareness of the world immediately around them, and eventually their journey will grow from there. Each student is an individual with unique ideas and talents. Our goal is to provide each student an opportunity for personal growth for themselves and the world in which we live.

ART DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 2
The importance of fine arts is a benefit, not just to the older student and population, but is a necessary area of development for the young student who will benefit with it in all areas of education. Art provides an opportunity for children to develop the use of their senses directly and encourages the student to further develop what they already know as a source of knowledge and creativity. It is important for the student to make a connection between the verbal and visual; logic and emotions; imagination and reality. Art offers the student an opportunity to express feelings and emotions in their drawings and with color. The fine art program promotes self-esteem and self-awareness as it enhances personal fulfillment. Children have a wonderful imagination that, if encouraged, will be needed though out their life. This program provides an opportunity for self-discipline through instruction and cooperation while providing the student with an opportunity for self-expression by using imaginative thinking for creative solutions. Again, this is a necessity in lifetime experiences. The student will see the artistic expressions and inventions from cultures around the world that are part of the history of mankind and development. Modern media provides many opportunities to the student. However, the student has the benefit to experience it more closely in art classes. Repetition, important for young children, is evident in these lessons. Repetition is provided at different age levels while using various tools and mediums. Home, family and friends, pets, and toys are the young student's world. The student will begin with their personal world as they think they know it and discover so much more about it. These lessons provide a deeper awareness of the world immediately around them, and eventually their journey will grow from there. Each student is an individual with unique ideas and talents. Our goal is to provide each student an opportunity for personal growth for themselves and the world in which we live.

ART DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 3
The Art program provides an opportunity for children to develop the use of their senses directly and encourages the student to further develop their personal source of knowledge and creativity. Art offers the student the opportunity to experience a connection between the verbal and visual; logic and emotions; imagination and reality. The student is guided and encouraged to express feelings and emotions in their drawings and with color while promoting self-esteem and self-awareness in personal fulfillment. The imagination in children is encouraged in art. However, it will assist them in their other studies as well. This program provides an opportunity for self discipline through instruction and cooperation while providing the student with an opportunity for self-express ion by using imaginative thinking for creative solutions. The student is introduced to some of the artistic expressions and techniques from cultures around the world. Modern technology provides opportunities for the student to observe this history. The art student will use some of these elements themselves in their own artwork. Repetition, important for children, is provided at different age levels while using various tools and mediums. Home, family, traditions, friends, pets, and toys are the young student's world. The student will explore what they know of their world. These lessons provide a deeper awareness of the world immediately around them where their journey is just beginning. As an individual each student is gifted with unique talents and ideas. Our goal is to provide each student an opportunity for personal growth for themselves and the world in which they live.

ART DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 4
The Art program provides an opportunity for children to develop the use of their senses directly and encourages the student to further develop their personal source of knowledge and creativity. Art offers the student the opportunity to experience a connection between the verbal and visual; logic and emotions; imagination and reality. The student is guided and encouraged to express feelings and emotions in their drawings and with color while promoting self-esteem and self-awareness in personal fulfillment. The imagination in children is encouraged in art. However, it will assist them in their other studies as well. This program provides an opportunity for self-discipline through instruction and cooperation while providing the student with an opportunity for self-expression by using imaginative thinking for creative solutions. The student is introduced to some of the artistic expressions and techniques from cultures around the world. Modern technology provides opportunities for the student to observe this history. The art student will use some of these elements themselves in their own artwork. Repetition, important for children, is provided at different age levels while using various tools and mediums. Home, family, traditions, friends, pets, and toys are the young student's world. The student will explore what they know of their world. These lessons provide a deeper awareness of the world immediately around them where their journey is just beginning. As an individual each student is gifted with unique talents and ideas. Our goal is to provide each student an opportunity for personal growth for themselves and the world in which they live.

ARTS AND CRAFTS – KINDERGARTEN
This course provides a foundation for children's inherent artistic imagination and creativity by sharing the basics of art and making art. Students are introduced to lines, circles, recognizing and using shapes, creating a collage and concepts such as symmetry. Young artists will also explore a variety of media such as pastels, watercolors, crayons, tempera, and pencil drawing. An emphasis on this course is on creating works of art. In this semester students will work with clay, draw with pastels, make fingerprint flowers, draw barns and animals using shapes and recognizing lines using the student's name.

ARTS AND CRAFTS – GRADE 1
This course provides a foundation for children's inherent artistic imagination and creativity by sharing the basics of art and making art. Students are introduced to primary colors, the color wheel shapes such as lines and circles, and concepts such as symmetry. Young artists will also explore a variety of media such as pastels, watercolors, crayons, tempera, and pencil drawing. An emphasis on this course is on creating works of art. In this semester students will work create a watercolor tree, use a printing block, produce weather painting, and produce a watercolor painting.

ARTS AND CRAFTS – GRADE 2
Art provides an opportunity for children to develop the use of their senses directly, encouraging the student to further develop what they already know as a source of knowledge and creativity. Art offers the student an opportunity to express feelings and emotions in their drawings and with color. Arts and Crafts promote self-esteem and self-awareness as it enhances personal fulfillment. Children have a wonderful imagination that, if encouraged will be needed though out their life. This course provides an opportunity for self-discipline through instruction and cooperation while providing-the student with an opportunity for self-expression by using imaginative thinking for creative solutions. Learners will begin the course by creating a color wheel and understanding the difference between primary, secondary, and complimentary colors. Learners will use watercolors to create a value chart and begin to understand symmetry in art. At the end of the semester students will work with clay and create a Memorial Clay.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – KINDERGARTEN
Elementary PE K helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include exercise safety, making healthy choices, nutrition, the benefits, components and principles of fitness, basic anatomy and physiology, and values of cooperation and teamwork. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 1
Elementary PE 1 helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include exercise safety, making healthy choices, nutrition, the benefits, components and principles of fitness, basic anatomy and physiology, and values of cooperation and teamwork. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 2
Elementary PE 2 helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include warm-up and cool down, water safety, goal setting, nutrition, muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 3
Elementary PE 3 helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include warm-up and cool down, water safety, goal setting, nutrition, muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 4
Elementary PE 4 helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include warm-up and cool down, water safety, goal setting, nutrition, muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 5
Elementary PE 5 helps young learners establish a basic understanding of health and fitness. Students focus on health-related fitness and learn how to become more fit and healthy. Topics of study include warm-up and cool down, water safety, goal setting, nutrition, muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, students learn age-appropriate motor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills. Students are required to participate in regular physical activity.

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VIRTUAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRADES 6-8

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 6
This course eases students’ transition to middle school with engaging, age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students learn to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence to support ideas as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts and explore a full unit on Lewis Carroll’s classic novel Through the Looking Glass. Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 7
Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author’s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students complete an in-depth study of Jack London’s classic novel White Fang and read excerpts from other stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS – GRADE 8
In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.

MATHEMATICS

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 6
This course begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. Students further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. This course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers. Students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 7
This course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning during which students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students’ number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.

MATHEMATICS – GRADE 8
The course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean Theorem, distance, and volume.

SCIENCE

SCIENCE – GRADE 6
Examining a broad spectrum of the Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences and Physical Sciences, this is a full-year course for middle school students that builds on basic principles found in each science discipline. Students will investigate Earth’s place in relation to the solar system, Milky Way galaxy, and universe. The course also includes units that help students understand the energy of moving objects, forces, and waves. Students will also explore the structure and function of cells, as well as how matter and energy is transferred in ecosystems.

SCIENCE – GRADE 7
In this course, topics from Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences and Physical Sciences will be studied. This is a full-year course for middle school students that builds on principles found in each science discipline. The course includes units that help students understand the structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions. The course also includes units on genetics, body systems, and the biodiversity and changes in ecosystems. Students will also investigate populations in ecosystems, as well as processes that affect the Earth’s weather.

SCIENCE – GRADE 8
This full-year course for middle school students builds on principles found in multiple science disciplines. Students will explore topics from Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences, and Physical Sciences. The course includes units that help students understand the geological process that cause the recycling of Earth’s materials and contribute to natural hazards. Students will construct explanations regarding diversity, extinction, and changes to living organisms, as well as explain how factors can influence the growth of organisms. This course will also provide opportunities for students to evaluate the use of thermal energy transfer used in ordinary devices.

SOCIAL STUDIES

WORLD HISTORY – GRADE 6
Providing students with an opportunity to learn the diverse history that has shaped our world, this course delves into the evolution of civilization from the rise of ancient empires through the 21st century. Middle school students enrolled in this exciting and informative course investigate the development of medieval societies, the effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation, and the progress made during various periods of revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and reform. Over the course of two semesters, students analyze effects of political conflicts and social issues on the continuing development and interdependence among nations in the modern world.

U.S. HISTORY – GRADE 7
Offering an interactive and comprehensive overview of American history, this course engages and inspires students to learn about the rich and diverse history of America’s native peoples, early European colonization and settlement in America, and the creation of a new nation through the American Revolution. Middle school students enrolled in this course will closely examine major changes brought about by the nation’s reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, and progressive reforms and consider the implications each of these events had on the expansion of the United States’ global influence through modern times. Over the course of two semesters, interesting course content encourages students to think carefully about the challenges and opportunities facing the United States in the 21st century.

LOUISIANA HISTORY – GRADE 8
In this social studies course, students explore the economic, political, and social changes that have formed Louisiana's identity as they learn about Louisiana's geography, colonial Louisiana, Antebellum period, Civil War and Reconstruction Era, Jim Crow Louisiana, Civil Rights Era and modern day Louisiana. Developing a solid knowledge of Louisiana's history will help students shape the state's future. In understanding the state's history, students become more inclined to participate in its future and become informed citizens.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH

MIDDLE SCHOOL FITNESS BASICS 1 & 2
This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and information needed to begin a personalized exercise program and maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. Students participate in pre- and post-fitness assessments in which they measure and analyze their own levels of fitness based on the five components of physical fitness: muscular strength, endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and body composition. In this course, students research the benefits of physical activity, as well as the techniques, principles, and guidelines of exercise to keep them safe and healthy. Throughout this course students participate in a weekly fitness program involving elements of cardio, strength, and flexibility.

MIDDLE SCHOOL INTRO TO GROUP SPORTS 1 & 2
This course provides students with an overview of group sports. Students learn about a variety of sports, and an in-depth study of soccer of basketball in Intro to Group Sports 1 and baseball/softball and volleyball in Intro to Group Sports 2. Students learn the history, rules, and guidelines of each sport, as well as game strategy and the benefits of sports. In addition, students study elements of personal fitness, goal setting, sport safety, and sports nutrition. Students conduct a pre- and post-fitness assessment, as well as participate in regular weekly physical activity as they practice skills related to group sports.

MIDDLE SCHOOL HEALTH
This comprehensive health course is designed for middle school students. It covers basic information about body systems, disease, and hygiene. Students explore the various realms of health, including mental, social, and emotional health. In addition, students learn important life skills such as decision-making and refusal skills

MIDDLE SCHOOL INTRO TO INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 1 & 2
This course provides students with an overview of individual sports. Students learn about a variety of sports, yet do an in-depth study of running, walking, strength training, yoga, dance, biking, swimming, and cross-training. Students learn not only the history, rules, and guidelines of each sport, but practice specific skills related to each sport. Students also learn about the components of fitness, FITT principles, benefits of fitness, safety and technique, and good nutrition. Students conduct fitness assessments and participate in weekly physical activity.


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VIRTUAL AND EDGENUITY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRADES 9–12

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ENGLISH I
This freshman-year English course engages students in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” They will also study short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

ENGLISH I HONORS
This freshman honors English course invites students to explore a variety of diverse and complex texts organized into thematic units. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and to participate in project-based learning activities, including writing a Shakespearian sonnet and creating an original interpretation of a Shakespearian play. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Jack London’s “To Build a Fire” and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” Students will also read Sue Macy’s full length nonfiction work Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way), and will study a variety of short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

ENGLISH II
Focused on application, this sophomore English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analysis, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.

ENGLISH II HONORS
This sophomore-year honors English course provides engaging and rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry to strengthen knowledge of language arts. Honors reading lessons require analyzing complex texts, while concise mini-lessons advance writing and research skills to craft strong, compelling essays and projects. Students will write argumentative and analytical essays based on literary texts, as well as an informative research paper using MLA style. Throughout the course, students read a range of classic and contemporary literary texts including Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. In addition to reading a wide range of literary texts, students read and analyze complex informational and argumentative texts including Sonia Sotomayor’s “A Latina Judge’s Voice,” Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, and the contemporary informational text Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science.

ENGLISH III
This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

ENGLISH IV
This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the modern period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.

BUSINESS ENGLISH
This course is one of two courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

TECHNICAL WRITING
Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Each of these reading intervention courses offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.

AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION
This college-level course prepares students for the AP® English Language and Composition Exam while exploring and analyzing a variety of rhetorical contexts. This is a fast-paced, upper-level course designed for highly motivated students. Multiple opportunities are provided to enhance test-taking skills through critical reading, writing, classroom assignments, and discussion activities. AP English Language and Composition practice assessments and essays will be given throughout the course as well. This course provides students an opportunity to increase knowledge concerning prose of many styles and genres, including essays, journalistic writing, political writing, science writing, nature writing, autobiographies/biographies, diaries, speeches, history writing, and critical writing. Throughout the course, there is an intense focus on writing and revising expository, analytical, and argumentative essays to prepare students for a broad range of writing purposes.

AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
English Literature and Composition is designed to be a college/ university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author’s or genre’s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. In addition to exposing students to college-level English course work, this course prepares them for the AP® English Literature and Composition Exam.

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I
This full-year course focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students’ understanding of linear and exponential functions and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

ALGEBRA I HONORS
This full-year honors course introduces students to linear, exponential, and quadratic functions by interpreting, analyzing, comparing, and contrasting functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Technology is utilized within some lessons to further support students in identifying key features as well as displaying images of the functions. The course builds upon the basic concepts of functions to include transformations of linear and non-linear functions. Students deepen their understanding of quantitative reasoning, piecewise functions, and quadratic functions through performance tasks. The additional performance-based skills allow the honors students to apply more of the concepts taught in the course. The course concludes with students analyzing data through displays and statistical analysis.

GEOMETRY
This course formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the laws of sines and cosines. Moving on to other shapes, students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis.

GEOMETRY HONORS
The course begins by exploring the foundational concepts of Euclidean Geometry in which students learn the terminology of geometry, measuring, proving theorems, and constructing figures. Students then expand on their knowledge of transformations and complete an assignment on identifying point symmetry as well as completing a performance task on tessellations. The course continues with an in-depth look at triangles where students prove theorems, relating congruency and similarity in terms of transformations, and connecting right triangles relationships to trigonometry. Students study set theory and apply probability through theoretical and experimental probability, two-way tables, and combinations and permutations. With lessons pertaining to quadrilaterals, students can identify the various figures based on their key features. Within the circles units, students identify angles, radii, and chords, perform a performance-based task on tangents, and then compute the circumference and area of various circles. Then students study parabolas, ellipses and hyperbolas before modeling and computing two- and three-dimensional figures.

ALGEBRA II
This course focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

ALGEBRA II HONORS
The course begins with a review of concepts that will assist students throughout the course, such as literal equations, problem solving, and word problems. Students then progress to a unit on functions where students compute operations of functions, compose of functions, and study inverses of functions. To build on their algebraic skills, students learn about complex numbers and apply them to quadratic functions via completing the square and quadratic formula methods. Next, students solve linear systems and apply their knowledge of the concept to three-by-three systems. An in-depth study on polynomial operations and functions allow students build their knowledge of polynomials algebraically and graphically. In the second semester, students study nonlinear functions. Students solve and graph rational and radical functions whereas the exponential and logarithmic functions focus on the key features and transformations of the functions. Expected value and normal distribution concepts expand and deepen students’ knowledge of probability and statistics. Students also cover trigonometric functions and periodic phenomena.

PRECALCULUS
With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

PRECALCULUS HONORS
This full-year advanced math course starts with a unit on the nature of functions and complex numbers before moving into matrices, systems, and linear programming. Students then return to functions with a focus on graphing a variety of function types; this unit includes a performance task on production schemes. Students explore rational functions in depth and then conclude the first semester with right triangle and circular trigonometry. In the second half of the course, students synthesize what they have learned to graph and solve trigonometric functions. They also study vectors, conics and analytic geometry, statistics and probability, mathematical modeling, and sequences and series.

BUSINESS MATH
Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.

FINANCIAL LITERACY
Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.

MATH ESSENTIALS
The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

AP® CALCULUS AB
This college-level, yearlong course prepares students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB Exam. Major topics of study in this full-year course include a review of pre-calculus, limits, derivatives, definite integrals, mathematical modeling of differential equations, and the applications of these concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to solve problems and draw conclusions. The course utilizes a multi-representative approach to calculus with concepts and problems expressed numerically, graphically, verbally, and analytically.

AP® STATISTICS
This year long, college-level course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics exam. Major topics of study include exploring one-and two-variable data, sampling, experimentation, probability, sampling distributions, and statistical inference. These topics are organized into three big ideas: variation and distribution, patterns and uncertainty, data-based predictions, decisions, and conclusions.

SCIENCE

PHYSICAL SCIENCE
This full-year course focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses.

BIOLOGY
This compelling two-semester course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology.

BIOLOGY HONORS
This compelling full-year course engages students in a rigorous honors-level curriculum that emphasizes the study of life and its real-world applications. This course examines biological concepts in more depth than general biology and provides a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include biochemistry, cellular structures and functions, genetics and heredity, bioengineering, evolution, structures and functions of the human body, and ecology. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

CHEMISTRY
This rigorous, full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.

CHEMISTRY HONORS
This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes mathematical problem solving and practical applications of chemistry. Topics are examined in greater detail than general chemistry in order to prepare students for college-level coursework. Course components include atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, states and changes of matter, chemical and redox reactions, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

PHYSICS
This full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students solve mathematical problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically about the physical world.

PHYSICS HONORS
This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes abstract reasoning and applications of physics concepts to real-world scenarios. Topics are examined in greater detail than general physics and provide a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include one- and two-dimensional motion, momentum, energy and thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.

AP® BIOLOGY
This year long, college-level course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Biology exam. Units of study include Biochemistry, Cells, Enzymes and Metabolism, Cell Communication and Cell Cycle, Gene Expression, Evolution and Genetic Diversity, and Ecology. This course includes student guides and materials lists for required hands-on labs; these materials are not included in the course.

AP® ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Environmental Science is a laboratory- and field-based course designed to provide students with the content and skills needed to understand the various interrelationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, and to propose and examine solutions to these problems. Since this is an online course, the laboratory- and field-based activities will be completed virtually and via experiments that students can easily perform at home with common materials. The course is intended to be the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level ecology course, which is taught over a full year in high school. The course encompasses human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law.

SOCIAL STUDIES

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems - from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution - this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.

U.S. HISTORY
U.S. History is a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on our country’s rise to global prominence. Students will also examine the influence of social and political movements on societal change and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and among multiple perspectives.

GOVERNMENT
This course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

WORLD HISTORY
This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

AP® UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS*
This one-semester college-level course is designed to prepare students for the AP United States Government and Politics exam. Students will study the Constitutional underpinnings and structure of the United States government, issues of politics and political parties, and topics in civil rights and public policy, demonstrating their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, project-based activities, and practice exams.

AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY
This course surveys the history of the United States from the settlement of the New World to modern times and prepares students for the AP® United States History Exam. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students learn to assess historical materials, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship, and analyze and express historical understanding in writing.

AP® WORLD HISTORY: MODERN
This advanced study of world history explores historical themes common to societies around the world and across time periods, from 1200 to the present day. Emphasis is placed on document analysis, historical thinking skills, reasoning processes, and essay writing. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, document-based questions, project-based activities, and practice exams.

AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Human Geography is a college-level course designed to prepare students for the AP® Human Geography Exam. The goal of the course is to provide students with a geographic perspective through which to view the world. Through a combination of direct instruction, documentary videos, and online readings, students will explore geographic concepts, theories, and models; human environment interactions; and interactions among human systems. Topics covered include population, culture, political organization of space, agricultural land use, industrialization, and urban land use. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through essays, document-based questions, student collaborative activities, and practice AP exams.

AP® PSYCHOLOGY
Psychology will introduce students to the systematic study of the behavior and mental processes of human means and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major fields within psychology. Students also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The major aim of this course is to provide each student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most introductory college psychology courses. In addition, this course has been designed to help students successfully achieve a passing score on the AP® Psychology exam.

WORLD LANGUAGES

SPANISH I
Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

SPANISH II
High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

FRENCH I
Students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.

FRENCH II
Students continue their introduction to French in this second year, high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I:
Foundations of Personal Wellness is a full-year offering that combines health and fitness instruction.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II:
Lifetime Fitness is a one-semester physical education course.

HEALTH
Healthy Living, a semester course, which focuses exclusively on personal health but in a more conservative and traditional treatment than Contemporary Health.

ELECTIVES

FINE ARTS SURVEY
Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, Intro to Art provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.

PSYCHOLOGY
This two-semester course introduces high school students to the study of Psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within Psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

ACT TEST PREP
This course provides students with the opportunity to prepare to successfully complete the ACT® college-entrance exam. Practice tests diagnose and target areas of opportunity, and students are prescribed individual study paths. The learning experience includes video-based instruction by highly qualified teachers, interactive assignments, and frequent assessment opportunities to track progress.

BASIC CAREER READINESS
This full-year course prepares middle and high school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of each student’s skills and interests.

ADVANCED CAREER READINESS A
Career Management is a semester-length high school course that assists students in their preparation for career selection. The course is designed to improve workforce skills needed in all careers including communication, leadership, teamwork, decision making, problem solving, goal setting and time management. Students complete activities that help identify personal interests, aptitudes, and learning styles. Students use results of self-assessments to determine careers that may prove personally satisfying.

ADVANCED CAREER READINESS B
Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This one-semester course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a résumé that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.

WORD PROCESSING
This full year course introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office® 2016 documents for both personal and professional use in Word® and Excel®. Students will also learn basic features of both Outlook® and PowerPoint®.

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS
In this two‐semester introductory course, students will learn the principles of business using real‐ world examples by learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economic basics, costs and profit, and different business types; techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society, locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This two-semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft® Office® 2016 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, Outlook®, and Access®. By the end of the course, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.

BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This two-semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft® Office® 2016 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, Outlook®, and Access®. By the end of the course, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.

LAW STUDIES
In this course, students learn about the many careers that exist within the fields of law, law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security. In addition to learning about the training and educational requirements for these careers, students explore the history of these fields and how they developed to their current state. Students also learn how these careers are affected by and affect local, state, and federal laws. Finally, students examine the relationships between professionals in these fields and how collaborations between professionals in these careers help to create a safer, more stable society.

SPEECH I
Beginning with an introduction that builds student understanding of the elements, principles, and characteristics of human communication, this course offers fascinating insight into verbal and nonverbal messages and cultural and gender differences in the areas of listening and responding. High school students enrolled in this course will be guided through engaging lectures and interactive activities, exploring themes of self-awareness and perception in communication. The course concludes with units on informative and persuasive speeches, and students are given the opportunity to critique and analyze speeches.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY LITERACY A
Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, Strategies for Academic Success encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY LITERACY B
In this one-semester course, students develop essential study skills for academic success, such as staying organized, managing time, taking notes, applying reading strategies, writing strong papers, and researching and properly citing information. Explicit modeling and ample practice are provided for each study skill to support student mastery. Instruction on how to be a responsible online learner is threaded throughout the course, and these skills are directly addressed in lessons on cyberbullying, staying safe online, and becoming a digital leader. A basic understanding of software and hardware and how to troubleshoot common technology issues are also taught. By the end of the course, students will have the tools they need to be academically successful in both traditional and digital learning environments.

COMPUTER SCIENCE
This full-year course is designed for students in grades 9-10, although any students across grades 9-12 may enroll. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can affect the world. Students have creative, hands-on learning opportunities to create computer programs, develop web pages, design mobile apps, write algorithms, and collaborate with peers while building strong foundational knowledge. This course provides a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills that students can use immediately.

CUSTOMER SERVICE
Customer Service is a course that is geared toward students interested in beginning or currently working in a customer-facing role. Learners will have the chance to develop a deeper understanding of the customer lifecycle, as well as building resumes and navigating job searches in the field.

CIW ESSENTIALS OF WEB DESIGN
This course teaches you essential Web page development skills. You will learn to develop Web sites using Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). You will learn to write code manually, as well as use graphical user interface (GUI) authoring tools. You will also work with images, create hyperlinks, and add tables, forms, video and audio to your Web pages. If you want the knowledge and skills to design or improve Web sites, this course is for you. In addition to learning about HTML5 and CSS coding, you will learn how to use HTML5 and JavaScript Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to extend the functionality of Web pages, such as geolocation, drag-and-drop, canvas and offline Web applications. Other topics include validating your HTML and CSS code, employing search engine optimization (SEO), using style sheets extensively to format Web page content, and implementing fundamental design concepts. Throughout the course, you will learn how Web sites are developed as managed projects. You will also identify e-commerce solutions and relate Web site development to business goals. Once certified, you have proven that you have foundational knowledge to develop basic Web sites. This certification is ideal for students and professionals who want a career in Web site design or marketing.

VIRTUAL WORKPLACE EXPERIENCE II
Virtual Workplace Experience II is a course that provides all students with a guided tour of Louisiana’s best-paying careers. VWE II provides all students - no matter where they go to school or their personal circumstances - dynamic opportunities to explore careers in Louisiana’s high-demand industry sectors and emphasizes student-selected project-based learning. Teachers customize the learning experience by offering their students their choice of tasks, reporting formats, and learning goals.

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