Unit 3

Comparison of Length, Weight, Capacity, and Numbers to 10

 

Kindergarten

Math

 

 

Description: Students begin to experiment with comparison of length, weight, and capacity.  Students first learn to identify the attribute being compared, moving away from non-specific language such as “bigger” to “longer than”, “heavier than”, “longer than”, etc.  The terms “more” and “less” become increasingly abstract, “7 is 2 more than 5” is more abstract than “Jim is taller than John”.

 

Louisiana Student Standards for Mathematics (LSSM)

 

Counting and Cardinality

K.CC.6

 

Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g. by using matching and counting strategies.

K.CC.7

 

Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

Measurement and Data

K.MD.1

 

Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

K.MD.2

 

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

K.MD.4

 

 

Recognize pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters by name and value (e.g., This is a nickel and it is worth 5 cents.

 

 

Enduring Understandings:

 

·         Students classify objects into given categories, count the number of objects in each category, and sort the categories by count.

·         Students apply counting and cardinality to objects in a set and write the corresponding numeral 11 – 20.

·         Students identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group by using matching and counting strategies.

·         Students describe measurable attributes of objects such as length and weight and can describe several measureable attributes of a single object.

 

Essential Questions:

 

·         How do we count? Why do we count?

·         Is there more than one way to count?

·         How do we classify and group things?

·         Why is it important for me to think in numbers?

·         How do I show my thinking in different ways?