Unit 4

“Leonardo’s Horse” by Jean Fritz

Grade 6
ELA

 

Unit Length and Description:

 

9 weeks

 

This unit concentrates on the Renaissance, combining nonfiction texts and informational nonfiction to provide students with a variety of readings.  Students will also research music and art from the Renaissance period.  The students will be required to share this information with their classmates.  These presentations will include the use of technology to convey the information. The culminating writing task will require the students to explain the concept of cultural “rebirth,” which is what the Renaissance is all about.  This unit connects to social studies, as the final unit in that subject also focuses on the Renaissance.

 

This unit will focus on craft and structure and integration of knowledge and ideas.  Writing will be predominately informative/explanatory.

 

Standards:

 

Reading Literature (Review appropriate absent standards)

 

RL.6.10

Skill(s): comprehension

The students can:

  • read a range of literary texts – fiction, poetry, and drama – within the grades 6-8 text complexity band, receiving help only when needed as they reach the high end of the band.

 

Reading Informational Texts (Review appropriate absent standards)

 

RI.6.10

Skill(s): comprehension

The students can:

  • read a range of literary nonfiction appropriate for the grades 6-8 text complexity band, receiving help only when needed as they reach the high end of the band.

 

Writing (Review appropriate absent standards)

 

W.6.2

Skill(s): writing informative/explanatory texts

The students can:

  • explain or provide information about a subject or idea(s), choosing only the details and information related to the topic, which are then introduced in a way that is both clear and allows readers to anticipate what will come after, organized (e.g., by classification, cause and effect, definition) and elaborated upon through the use of graphics (e.g., tables and charts) and document design (e.g., sub headers),
  • build on these ideas by including facts, examples, concrete details, and evidence, usually in the form of quotations,
  • help these details flow and reveal the links between these ideas by making careful use of transitions, which improve cohesion, and precise vocabulary, which aids the writer trying to explain the topic,
  • bring their paper to an end, drawing what conclusions there are about this subject and conveying them in a way that makes sense for a coherent and useful ending that logically connects to all that preceded it and provides the necessary support for those ideas explained or presented.

 

W.6.10

Skill(s): writing

The student can:

  • write regularly for a range of reasons (e.g., to reflect, research, and revise) in different contexts and modes (timed, in-class, and extended tasks), for a variety of audiences.

 

Speaking and Listening (Review appropriate absent standards)

 

SL.6.6

Skill(s): adapting speech

The students can:

  • Decide what to say and how to say it, adjusting their voice and style to suit the occasion, purpose, and audience, while always modeling their command of formal English when it is appropriate.

 

Language (Review appropriate absent standards)

 

L.6.6

Skill(s): expanding vocabulary

The students can:

  • learn and use the language of discourse appropriate to the subject, discipline, or context when reading, writing, or speaking about it, noting that some of these words are specific to the subject being studied,
  • use other words not so specific to a given discipline but better understood as key academic literacy terms, and
  • be familiar with certain roots or etymologies as alternative ways to make sense of those new words encountered for the first time.

 

Enduring Understandings:

 

·         The Renaissance begins because, after a long period of studying scientific facts, people began to become curious again.

·         Art during the Renaissance is an improved version of ancient Greek and Roman creations.

·         Leonardo da Vinci and other artists, philosophers, and scientists are some of the most influential artists and thinkers of the Renaissance.

·         “Thinking outside the box” can inspire extraordinary inventions.

·         We continue to study the Renaissance to learn from the past and improve the future.

 

Essential Questions:

 

·         What caused the Renaissance to begin?

·         How does art evolve during the time of the Renaissance?

·         Who are some of the most influential artists and thinkers of the Renaissance?

·         Why is it important to “think outside the box?”

·         Why do we continue to study the Renaissance today?